William Hutchison and Debbie Howell

Beginning Kiln Formed Glass

July 10th – 14th, 2017

This work shop will provide you with a solid understanding of the types of art glass that is available and how to achieve the various results desired through the use of kilns and other equipment. Students will learn what ‘fusible glass’ is and the different forms that this glass comes in. Students will also learn how to program a kiln for the desired results and then how to further refine their kiln formed glass piece through the use of ‘cold-working’ equipment.

We will be focusing on ‘fusible glass’ and what the properties are for this type of glass as well as touching on the history of glass and the other types of art glass. We will be using ‘fusible glass’ in its different forms (sheet, crushed and long stingers) in the creation of your artwork, which will then be placed into the kiln and fired. We will be going over how kilns work and what temperatures should be programmed into the kiln in order to achieve the desired result for the various glass creations. Once your glass artwork has been fired, we will then decide if further work needs to be done to the glass. Polishing techniques, as well as immediate refinements, can be achieved through the use of various cold-working equipment which you may choose to employ for a final professional look.

Students should wear close toed shoes for protection and come to each class on time ready to participate. Students are encouraged to bring their own personal tools, if any, and a notepad but please note that all items necessary for the class will be made available for you.

wm-debbie-combing

Advanced Kiln Formed Glass

July 17th – 21st, 2017

Advanced Techniques for Kiln Formed Glass

(aka Fused Glass: Beyond the Basics)

This work shop will delve into the more advanced techniques for fusible glass. Students will learn how the push the glass to its limits and what can be expected from the glass, as well as learning how to program kilns for unusual firing schedules. Students will also learn more advanced cold-working skills that are necessary for polished finishes of uneven surfaces.

We will be going into depth about the limitations of fusible glass and how to avoid some of the common problems that can result from pushing the glass beyond its normal parameters. We will be manipulating molted glass while it is in the kiln as well as setting up the glass inside the kiln in order to achieve flow patterns that could not otherwise be achieved outside of the kiln. Students will be creating a 3D art piece through the use of only crushed glass (a process known as ‘pate de verre’) and exploring how to achieve very fine line crisp details with powders. Programming the kilns for these ‘outside of the norm’ firing schedules will be discussed so that you can understand why and how the firing schedules are determined. Other types of cold-working equipment and hand tools will be used to highlight what final look can be achieved in your artwork.

Students should wear close toed shoes for protection and come to each class on time ready to participate. Students are encouraged to bring their own personal tools, if any, and a notepad but please note that all items necessary for the class will be made available for you.

 


hutchison Harringbone bowlHutchison
Hutchison red harringboneHutchison
debbie-autumn

Debbie Howell “Autumn” glass

Bios

William Hutchison’s H-Studio concentrates on glass. The work is both functional and sculptural. The bowls and platters are linear with precision, interesting colors, and patterns. The sculptural “Dangerous Toys” are cast, cold-worked to be able to create inter-changeable sculptures. William has a background in fine woodworking with a precision influence from 5 years in a machine shop. He has taught workshops in glass fusing at Sierra Nevada College for 10 years. His work has been displayed in galleries, exhibitions and private collections. In 2016, his cold working skills were taken to another level after an extended session at Pilchuck Glass School.

Debbie Howell grew up in Reno and graduated from the University of Nevada with a degree in science. Although she has always enjoyed working in the corporate world, over the years she has also explored her creative side which lead to a fascination with glass art.

Debbie creates her own work at The Glass Studio which is set up as a studio, retail store and teaching facility. The studio allows her to create glass art and experiment with new ideas, hold Open Studio hours for other glass enthusiasts to use the studio equipment, and provides an inviting facility for teaching glass classes ranging from beginning to more advanced techniques. Debbie is also one of the participating artists in the upcoming Reno Open Studios October 2015 Tour www.artouring.com. Her glass art is held in private collections and she is currently open to gallery representation.

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