We publish writing that leans toward the unconventional, surprising, and risky. We appreciate experiments in form and content, and prefer works whose meanings deepen on repeated readings.

The Sierra Nevada Review

The Sierra Nevada Review is an annual literary magazine published in May featuring poetry, short fiction, and literary nonfiction. Editors read manuscripts from September until mid-February. Response time may vary between several weeks and several months. The editorial staff changes on a yearly basis with the exception of the advisory editors, June Sylvester Saraceno and Courtney Berti.

We publish writing that leans toward the unconventional, surprising, and risky. We appreciate experiments in form and content, and prefer works whose meanings deepen on repeated readings.

Order Issues

Current issues of the Sierra Nevada Review are available for $10.00, back issues for $5.00 post paid.
Purchase the Review Online
or send a check or money order to The Sierra Nevada College Review, 999 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village, NV 89451-9500.

Submissions

Please send no more than five poems or five pages of poetry, whichever comes first. Fiction, literary nonfiction, or hybrid works should not exceed 4000 words.

The best way to get an idea of what sort of material we publish is to read the review and submit your work to us if we look like your kind of place – order information above.

Submissions are open between September 1st and February 15th. Please only send one submission per reading period. Additional submissions will not be considered.

Contributors receive two complimentary copies. Writers retain all rights.

Submit to the Sierra Nevada Review


From the Blog


Interview with Matthew Komatsu

04.07.2017

Reading his publication history—Brevity, The Southeast Review, The New York Times—you’d never know SNR contributor Matthew Komatsu started writing in earnest in 2013. Sierra Nevada Review’s Michael Fischer sat down with Komatsu to talk about his work in SNR’s most recent issue, his feelings about being called a war writer, and the pitfalls of “MFA voice.” Michael Fischer: There are things in “Penuel" that go unexplained; you seem to be trusting the reader to catch . . READ MORE


Interview with Traci Brimhall

04.02.2017

I recently spoke with award-winning poet Traci Brimhall about blending genres, the writing process, grief, and why she just might be the Quentin Tarantino of poetry.  Wendy Hill: Your third book, Saudade, is forthcoming in 2017 from Copper Canyon Press, and you call it an autobiomythography. How did you approach genre in Saudade? What were the limitations in poetry, biography, memoir, or myth that led you to create a genre of your own? Traci Brimhall: I can't claim . . READ MORE


Interview with Andrew Bertaina

03.25.2017

The week that SNR contributor Andrew Bertaina spoke with Sierra Nevada Review, he had just found the holy grail: one of his flash fiction pieces had recently been published by Tin House, one of America's most prestigious literary journals. Bertaina spoke with one of SNR’s managing editors about this latest publishing success, his writing process, and his feelings on the future of the printed page. Michael Fischer: Walk me through the conception of “One Person . . READ MORE


An Interview with Wyl Villacres

10.27.2016

I recently sat down with writer Wyl Villacres for a wide-ranging conversation about his work, his life, and why he’s sick of running into Irvine Welsh. Wyl Villacres is a bartender from Chicago. He's the author of the chapbook, Bottom of the Ninth (WhiskeyPaper 2015), and his stories have appeared in The Rumpus, McSweeney's, and Hobart Pulp, among others. Wyl was included in the 2014 Best of the Net anthology and was a notable selection . . READ MORE

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