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We publish writing that leans toward the unconventional, surprising, and risky. We appreciate experiments in form and content, and prefer works whose meanings deepen on repeated readings.

The Sierra Nevada Review

The Sierra Nevada Review is an annual literary magazine published in May featuring poetry, short fiction, and literary nonfiction. Editors read manuscripts from September until mid-February. Response time may vary between several weeks and several months. The editorial staff changes on a yearly basis with the exception of the advisory editors, June Sylvester Saraceno and Laura Wetherington.

We publish writing that leans toward the unconventional, surprising, and risky. We appreciate experiments in form and content, and prefer works whose meanings deepen on repeated readings.

Order Issues

Current issues of the Sierra Nevada Review are available for $10.00, back issues for $5.00 post paid. to purchase online, or send a check or money order to The Sierra Nevada College Review, 999 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village, NV 89451-9500.

Order Issues

Submissions

Please send no more than five poems or five pages of poetry, whichever comes first. Fiction, literary nonfiction, or hybrid works should not exceed 4000 words.

The best way to get an idea of what sort of material we publish is to read the review and submit your work to us if we look like your kind of place – order information above.

Submissions are open between September 1st and February 15th. Please only send one submission per reading period. Additional submissions will not be considered.

Contributors receive two complimentary copies. Writers retain all rights.

Submit to the Sierra Nevada Review
Submit to the High School Writing Contest


From the Blog


Allegiance to Nature: An Interview with SNR Contributor Sadie Shorr-Parks

01.02.2016

       Sadie Shorr-Parks piece, “Rat King Coal” was published in the 2015 edition of the Sierra Nevada Review. “Rat King Coal” concerns itself with the author’s allegiance to not only the Appalachian Mountains, but also nature itself in West Virginia. It is a critique of the coal companies in this area that are decimating nature and, with their practices, making its inhabitants gravely ill.       In addition to being published in . . READ MORE


The Intersection of Grief and Art: An Interview with Aisha Sabatini Sloan

14.12.2015

Aisha Sabatini Sloan’s “Ocean Park No 6” appeared in the 2015 issue of the Sierra Nevada Review, and was one of our nominees for the Pushcart Prize. The essay explores the grief of Juliette, a friend of Sloan’s, after the death of Juliette’s son Ramin. The essay weaves the exploration of her grief with an exploration of artists such as Joan Didion, Michael Ondaatje, Richard Diebenkorn, and others, creating a tapestry that explores how art . . READ MORE


Cover Art Contest

12.12.2015

Each year the Sierra Nevada Review solicits current SNC students for their best artwork. If you would like a chance at having your work viewed by readers around the world, enter our annual cover art contest! Guidelines: Open to current SNC students Size - 5.5" x 8.5" at 300dpi Format - JPEG or TIFF format, uncompressed. Deadline – December 1st https://sierranevadareview.submittable.com/submit   . . READ MORE


Crisp Days and Blue Skies: An Interview with Christine Lasek

20.11.2015

Christine Lasek’s “Precious Blood” is, on one level, a short story about a grandfather purchasing a pickup truck in which a man committed suicide. But the story, which appeared in the 2014 issue of the Sierra Nevada Review, is also about memory, war, loss and the bonds of family. Lasek’s debut collection, Love Letters to Michigan, will be published in April 2016 by ELJ Publications. She holds an MFA in fiction from the University of . . READ MORE

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